Category Archives: FIRE

02 AY 22 Defence Fire Services MK11 Scammell Super Major 6×6 Gloster..

02 AY 22
Defence Fire Services
MK11 Scammell Super Major 6×6 Gloster Saro Crash Tender
The MK11 was introduced in the late 80s as a Primary one foam tender to supplement the MK9 fleet. They were mostly based on passenger aircraft airfields and some were fitted with turntable ladders for accessing TriStar flight decks (Mk11A). With an impressive performance and powerful Rosenbauer monitor the Mk11 proved a popular vehicle to work with. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

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C763 GVU RAF Fire and Rescue MK10 Carmichael/Scammell Nubian

C763 GVU
RAF Fire and Rescue
MK10 Carmichael/Scammell Nubian
It was in 1981 that Carmichael built the prototype of the MK10 for the RAF Fire Service; it was designed as a Primary 2 Truck which would be used on smaller category airfields. Several variants were made. Most of the MK 10 & 10A versions were converted to a MK10E with the fitting of a new cab and new monitor pipe work. The first Mark 10’s originally had one tank containing a premix foam solution but because of domestic fire fighting requirements the MK10A’s were fitted with separate water and foam tanks. The 10B had a turbo fitted and the 10C was only supplied to the Royal Navy and was fitted with a high pressure pump. The 10D was fitted out to accommodate the Clan Lucas rescue kit. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

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02 AY 04 RAF Bedford M1120 4×4

02 AY 04
RAF
Bedford M1120 4×4
Part of The Queens Flight. Several types of vehicles before this were used to support the Helicopter Support Uni (HSU). Three of these vehicles were manufactured. This one, the Bedford M1120 4×4, was built by Edgehills of Hook and was introduced in 1985; It is diesel powered and was designed to carry 200 gallons of AFFF and 120 gallons of Aviation fuel. It carried extinguishers, hand tools, first aid equipment and was complete with it’s own pump. This one was introduced in 1985. They were painted RAF blue with no identification markings. Apart from it’s role as fire rescue/and aircraft refuelling, it also carried radio equipment to act as air traffic control. The RAF Fire-fighters would also act as liaison with all the local area agencies. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

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HXA 912 Austin K6 CO2 Tender

HXA 912
Austin K6 CO2 Tender
This truck has four banks of six 60lb CO2 cylinders. Each bank of cylinders has its own operating lever situated on the outside of the cylinder housing and an effective discharge time of 2 minutes. It was built on an Austin K6 3ton chassis and was the first Crash Tender to employ CO2 gas only as an extinguishing medium. It came into service in 1945. The total discharge of the tender is approximately 11,500 cubic feet of CO2 gas. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

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Thorneycroft Nubian TFA 6×6

Thorneycroft Nubian TFA 6×6
The MK7 was introduced in 1965 to supplement the MK6 fleet, and basically consisted of a DP2 chassis fitted with a Rolls Royce B81 Petrol engine and MK6 foam equipment. With it’s improved reliability, a suction eye and water pumping capability, the MK 7 was a more versatile primary one foam tender. It was also easier to transport by air and saw service world wide. This vehicle has a 700 gallon water tank, a foam liquid tank capacity of 110 gallons and a foam output of 5000 gallons per minute through monitor and two side-lines or through double-jet monitor. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

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Mk 5 Thorneycroft/Rolls Royce foam tender

Mk 5 Thorneycroft/Rolls Royce foam tender
The Mk5 Crash Tender was one of the first of the post war vehicles entered service in 1952. It carried 400 gallons of water and 60 gallons of foam. Primarily a RAF appliance this vehicle could also be used for domestic (structural) firefighting. It had a foam output of 2300 gallons per minute through two hand side-lines. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

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Mk 5 Thorneycroft/Rolls Royce foam tender

Mk 5 Thorneycroft/Rolls Royce foam tender
The Mk5 Crash Tender was one of the first of the post war vehicles entered service in 1952. It carried 400 gallons of water and 60 gallons of foam. Primarily a RAF appliance this vehicle could also be used for domestic (structural) firefighting. It had a foam output of 2300 gallons per minute through two hand side-lines. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

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51 AG 49 / GBG 542Y RAF Fire and Rescue Service TACR2

51 AG 49 / GBG 542Y
RAF Fire and Rescue Service
TACR2
The TACR2 was the replacement for the TACR1 and was introduced to the RAF Fire Service in 1977. It was based on a chassis which was developed by Carmichael and Sons in the early 1970s. The RAF ordered some 46 which had Gloster Saro bodywork. HCB – Angus also built a further 18. They remained in service until 1985 and were replaced by the TACR2A. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

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28 AG 00 RAF Fire and Rescue Service TACR1

28 AG 00
RAF Fire and Rescue Service
TACR1
The TACR1 came into service in 1972 and was the beginning of a new generation of rescue tender for the RAF. It superseded the ACRT (Dry Powder) and TACT (Old type Foam). The TACR1 carried a new fire fighting media which was AFFF (Aqueous Film Forming Foam) which was pre-mixed in the tank. It also carried an EPCO Hydraulic Rescue kit and a Pneumatic powered ‘Ripper Gun’. It was capable of acting in an unsupported roll on advanced airfields operating with the HARRIER aircraft with a crew of three, but would also act as the rescue truck along with major foams trucks on large Crash Lines. With the requirement for a crew of three and only a standard cab, a seating position was created at the rear of the vehicle for the third crew member whose only communication to the cab was via a voice tube. Not always popular with crew members when assigned to this vehicle!!! This vehicle 28 AG 00 on display is the very first that was supplied to the RAF Fire Service. As well as carrying out Crash Line duties 28 AG 00 was deployed in 1977 to St. George’s Barracks in Sutton Coalfield dring the National Fireman’s Strike, (Operation Burbury). The crews acted as a B.A. team in support of 42 Marine Commando and attended some 230 incidents in a 58 day period. It saw service at RAF units Manston, Newton and Swinderby before being sold at the end of its service. It was recovered from Lydden Motor Race Circuit in Kent where it had been used as fire and rescue truck. During its extensive restoration it revealed eight layers of paint which included red, green and Day-Glo. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

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10 AY 11 RAF Fire Service Truck Airfield Crash Rescue Mk2A (TACR2A)

10 AY 11
RAF Fire Service
Truck Airfield Crash Rescue Mk2A (TACR2A)
The TACR2A is a variant of the TACR2 which was the replacement for the TACR1 and was introduced into the RAF Fire Service in 1977. The RAF ordered some 46 which had Gloster Saro bodywork. HCB-Angs also built a further 18. The TACR2 remained in service until 1985 and were replaced by the TACR2A. This was to be the last of the small rescue vehicles and would be replaced by the larger RIVs (Rapid Intervention Vehicle) which was the new parlance for a rescue vehicle. The main differences between the TACR2 and 2A were the front bumper and lighting arrangement and the use of fuel injected engine. The vehicle displayed 10 AY 11 served its days in ‘The Queens Flight’ deploying to various sites though out the UK helping to safeguard the Royal Family. The TACR2A lasted until the late 1990s. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

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