Category Archives: Vintage Fire

UOH 811S Land Rover 109 Series 3

UOH 811S
Land Rover 109 Series 3
Hand-built fire vehicle from 1978. It is a self-propelled foam deluge unit. It has a 2.6 litre six cylinder petrol engine. It was specially built for Eggborough Power Station in North Yorkshire. The vehicle would have connected to a water supply using lengths of hose to produce a fire-fighting foam. The cannon could deliver the foam over a great area. The vehicle ended its frontline service in 2018 when the power plant was decommissioned. It was kept in service during initial demolition works as a dust supression unit. It was then donated to the National Emergency Services Museum in late 2018.

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LFM 200 City of Chester Fire Brigade Dennis F7

LFM 200
City of Chester Fire Brigade
Dennis F7
Dating from 1949, this pump escape has been fully restored when sen in 2018. It is part of Cheshire FRS’s historic fleet. The Rolls Royce 8-cylinder engine, combined with a 4-speed gearbox, propells the emergency appliance from 0-60 mph in a heady 45 seconds. Fuel consumption is usually 3 or 4 mpg.

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NCB 100 Blackburn Fire Brigade Dennis F28

NCB 100
Blackburn Fire Brigade
Dennis F28
New to the roads in January 1961, this fire engine originally served in Blackburn and is now in preservation. When new it cost £4,500 and was the first fire vehicle in the county to be fitted with a blue flashing light – a new Home Office recommendation at the time. The name plate for Alderman Robert F Mottershead is in honour of the vice chairman of the watch and the fire birgade committee of the town council.

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EFF 317D Merioneth Fire Service Bedford J5

EFF 317D
Merioneth Fire Service
Bedford J5
First registered in July 1966, this appliance wound its way around the narrow lanes of Merionethshire in North Wales. Due to the double cab, the gearbox is not near to the driver. This means a very long kink in the gear lever is needed to reach four foot behind the driver’s position. When new recruits were being taught to drive the sometimes tempremantal vehicle, a crafty rear seta passenger could gently put their foot on the gear lever and prevent the driver selecting a gear!

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