Category Archives: Mountain Rescue

The mountain rescue services use 4×4 vehicles to get to difficult to reach places. Their work includes rescuing casualties and find missing people.

J344 UDU is one of Swaledale MRT’s rescue ambulances…

J344 UDU is one of Swaledale MRT’s rescue ambulances. Based at Catterick, they respond to about 25 emergency calls per year. Notice the length of rope on the front and the ‘rescue’ mirror-image ‘number plate’.
The rear view of the 1992 Land Rover. Inside is seating, a stretcher and an array of equipment.
The above ambulance used to be a front line vehicle with Durham County Ambulance Service in the 1990s. Here it is in its former paint-scheme and roll in early 2000.
Share this with Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest | Follow us on FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

PY52 JSX This is a cloder look at the Land Rover used …

PY52 JSX This is a cloder look at the Land Rover used by Cockermouth Mountain Rescue Team to get help to people who are in difficulties on the fells in the Lake District, Cumbria. A full blue light bar on the roof is complemented with repeaters on the front bumper and around the roof rack.
Flashing blue and white lights help motorists see the vehicle a distance away. This is the one of the three vehicles operated by Cockermouth MRT.
The rear view of the same Land Rover. You can see that the spare wheel cover has specially made art work on it, and the windows are tinted black.
Share this with Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest | Follow us on FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

G693 NHH leaving the rescue base. It is a 1990 blue Land …

G693 NHH leaving the rescue base. It is a 1990 blue Land Rover 110 V8 also with Cockermouth and is equipped in the same way as the 2002 example above. Notice the bulky winch fitted to the front and the orange paintwork around the grille to increase its road presence.
The rear view of the same Land Rover. It can carry eight people to an incident on the fells using its 182 bhp V8 engine. This Land Rover (G693 NHH) was made famous by being featured in a two-page spread in the “Big Book of Rescue Vehicles”.
Share this with Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest | Follow us on FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

CN04 NPC is a Land Rover Defender 110 TD5 used by the …

CN04 NPC is a Land Rover Defender 110 TD5 used by the Central Beacons Mountain Rescue Team. The roof and the inside of the vehicle are filled with specialist rescue equipment. Notice how the roof light bar is nearly covered by the substantial roof rack.
The rear view, showing the additional blue rotating beacon above the rear door. Notice the wording on the wheel cover advising other vehicles to stay back from the Land Rover.
Share this with Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest | Follow us on FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

PN02 SVR This is a Keswick Mountain Rescue Land Rover …

PN02 SVR This is a Keswick Mountain Rescue Land Rover Defender Td5.
The side view of the same Landy. It has minimal livery but the bright orange stripe and roof make it stand out from other traffic. All sides have bright floodlights to illuminate the ground immediate around the vehicle.
The rear view. The high-intensity blue flashing lights at the rear complement the light bar at the front of the roof and the repeaters on the front grille. The white pole to the right is a telescopic communications antenna, essential in mountainous terrain where mobile ‘phones don’t work.
The rear three-quarter view. The registration plate is just visible behind the ladder and mesh protector.
Share this with Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest | Follow us on FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

R242 WRM This is Keswick’s custom-built Ford Transit …

R242 WRM This is Keswick’s custom-built Ford Transit County. It is in the same livery as their Land Rovers, with just as much ground clearance.
The front view, showing the flashing lights and the roof rack.
The rear. The door is hinged at the top so it swings up and out of the way to allow a casualty on a stretcher to be loaded. The injured party is then driven to a waiting ambulance or taken directly to hospital.
The rear three-quarter view of the Transit. The roof rack can be quickly removed by unplugging the electrics and unclipping the metal clamps.
Share this with Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest | Follow us on FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter