Category Archives: Rescue

T727 TWX Another of Pennine Rescue’s vehicles is …

T727 TWX Another of Pennine Rescue’s vehicles is this green Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 312D rescue ambulance. This smart van has two light bars and repeater blue lights on the grille as well as an eye-catching battenburg livery.
The rear view. The company emphasises the ‘rescue’ side of their service rather than the ‘ambulance’ side. ‘Rescue’ is written on every side of the vehicle, between the blue lights on the roof bar and on the personnel’s clothing. The vehicles carry amongst other items fire fighting equipment and heavy cutting equipment, including the jaws of life, spreaders and saws.
Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

T926 JHE This Ford Galaxy is used for emergency …

T926 JHE This Ford Galaxy is used for emergency personnel transportation. It is used when an incident demands additional trained personnel, but not additional rescue equipment. It is not unusual for this vehicle to travel hundreds of miles to assist other mine rescuers. The comfort level and speed far exceeds that of the Ford Transit.
The rear view of the Ford Galaxy. This £24,000 MPV is the V6 ghia model with the 2.8 litre petrol engine producing 174 break horsepower. The light bar is mounted on the roof rails to aid removal when selling the vehicle later. A 51-plate darker blue 2.3 litre Galaxy has also been purchased. It is undecided if this vehicle will be liveried-up or not (not pictured).
Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

M326 XWF Another Ford Transit based at the Selby …

M326 XWF Another Ford Transit based at the Selby station. This is the Hi-Cube version (high roof line) because it is a personnel carrier. It has two sets of blue lights on the roof. It is quite unusual for an emergency vehicle of this height not to have additional blue repeater lights mounted next to the headlamps. The blue roof lights may not be seen when motorists look in their mirrors.
Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

SN05 AHK This IRC rescue ambulance is based at Grangemouth…

SN05 AHK This IRC rescue ambulance is based at Grangemouth, Scotland. It is an Iveco Daily with red and blue checker markings. It can accommodate up to eight people and carries medical equipment.
The rear view. Notice the blue light repeaters at the tops of the doors as the main light bar is at the front of the roof. As a sideline, this vehicle provides medical cover at Land Rover’s test course at Perth.
Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

FJ05 EPP This Iveco Daily is operated by the Derbyshire …

FJ05 EPP This Iveco Daily is operated by the Derbyshire Cave Rescue Organisation. The organisation provides underground rescue support to police forces in Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Cheshire, Derbyshire, Greater Manchester, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, South Yorkshire, Staffordshire and Warwickshire.
The rear view of the vehicle showing the equipment storage area. The vehicle is based at DCRO’s main base to the rear of Buxton Fire Station.
Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

S263 LUB, W807 FEC and L402 LNW Left to right are CRO3, CRO2 and CRO1…

S263 LUB, W807 FEC and L402 LNW Left to right are CRO3, CRO2 and CRO1. These three Land Rovers show the line-up of blue-light response vehicles at the CRO’s Clapham base in January 2006. The organisation assists with cave rescues, mountain rescues, search and rescues and other similar tasks. They are called out by the police or ambulance service.
A closer look at the front of the Land Rover CRO2. Large bold wording is used on the front grille, roofrack and sides to show the use of the vehicle. A full blue light bar and alternately flashing headlights indicate when the vehicle is being used to respond to an emergency. These are complemented by a blue rotating beacon on the rear.
The rear view. The red ramps on the roofrack are for placing under the wheels on difficult terrain. However, the Land Rover can already cope very well with almost any obstacle to get equipment and people to a remote location.
Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter