26 AG 70 RAF Fire Service Alvis/Pyrene MKVI Crash Truck

26 AG 70
RAF Fire Service
Alvis/Pyrene MKVI Crash Truck
This was the first MK6 production model, made in 1956. Despite having the same outward appearance as later models, the MK6 has a smaller foam monitor in comparison. Production of the MK6 ended around 1963, although they remained in service until 1978. This vehicle spent some of its time at RAF Wyton in the 1970s and in 1976 was downgraded to instructional assembly. Records show that this crash truck served in Coastal, Transport, Fighter and Maintenance Commands. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

RAF 108140 RAF Fordson War Office Type One / Fordson (WOT1)

RAF 108140
RAF
Fordson War Office Type One / Fordson (WOT1)
Dating from 1941, this tender was one of the first fire tenders to be used during the advance after the D-Day landings on the forward air bases set up by the RAF and American Air Forces throughout France, Belgium, Holland and Germany. This WOT1 found its way to Berlin where it was stationed for operational purposes during the Berlin airlift in 1946. It returned to England in 1953 and was sold for scrap. In the late 70s Mr Tony Corbin found it in very poor condition on a farm and spent over 20 years restoring it to its present condition. Out of the 6 of these vehicles which were sent abroad this is the only camouflage one and there are only 3 of these vehicles left. This vehicle is fully operational and kitted as per wartime. The WOT1 was used as a major foam tender by the RAF and American Air Force Fire Services during WWII on all of their operational airfields on both fighter and bomber stations from 1941 – 1952. The vehicle was manned by a crew of five, 1 MT Driver and 4 Firemen; the MT Driver would act as pump operator. One Fireman would be dressed in an asbestos suit, for rescue duties, the others who operated the foam hose lines would be dressed in overalls, leather jackets and rubber boots, and a steel helmet with a skirt to cover the head and neck area. They were also equipped with an axe & belt and a quick release knife for cutting aircrew harnesses. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

23 AG 56 RAF MK6 Alvis/Pyrenne Crash Truck

23 AG 56
RAF
MK6 Alvis/Pyrenne Crash Truck
Made in 1956, this was one of the first of the variants of the MK6 production model. The MK6A, MK6B, MK6C & MK6D came out later. Externally they all looked alike, but this model has a smaller foam monitor than the later models. Production of the MK6 ended around 1963, although they remained in service until 1978. This vehicle spent some of its time at RAF Wyton in the 1970s and in 1976 was downgraded to instructional assembly. Records show that this crash truck served in Coastal, Transport, Fighter and Maintenance Commands. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

RXP 884 Emergency Fire Service Bedford RLHZ

RXP 884
Emergency Fire Service
Bedford RLHZ
Power supplied by Cummins Diesel Engine with 130 BHP. This vehicle is a rare example of updating the original Green Goddess to be more modern. It was fitted with a brighter colour scheme, including a red stripe, and the engine was upgraded to be more powerful. Sadly the conversions worked out too expensive to be practical and ultimately the government sold off the Green Goddess fleet rather than upgrading. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

28 AJ 52 Royal Air Force Dennis / Thornycroft Nubian Major Foam Tend..

28 AJ 52
Royal Air Force
Dennis / Thornycroft Nubian Major Foam Tender MK9
The introduction of the MK9 along with TACR1 and new foams began a new era in crash fire-fighting. The MK 9 has a large tank capacity of 1250 gallons for water and 130 gallons for foam liquid. This meant that the MK9 did not need to rely upon extra water being delivered from DP trucks. The MK9 also had an impressive jet throw from its monitor which made it a particularly powerful and effective tool in fighting large aircraft fires. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

A153 OVG Royal Air Force Bedford Mountain 4×4

A153 OVG
Royal Air Force
Bedford Mountain 4×4
The Bedford Mountain 4×4 was introduced in 1985 to fight fires on RAF sites which had Bloodhound missiles. After these missiles were removed from service these vehicles were used for domestic fire-fighting duties. The roof hatch was controlled by a monitor fitted to the cab roof. Stone guards protect the windscreen from flying debris, and a First Aid Hose Reel was also provided. There were 11 of this type of vehicle built. This particular vehicle served at RAF Nordhorn and was later sold to the Civil Defence Corp where it was sprayed bright yellow, it then moved to Seething Airfield in Norfolk (the lettering from which is still visible through its most recent respray). Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

KFF 132 / 24 AG 59 RAF Fire Service Thornycroft Nubian 4×4 Dual Purp..

KFF 132 / 24 AG 59
RAF Fire Service
Thornycroft Nubian 4×4 Dual Purpose (DPMK1/1A) Appliance
It was built to replace the wartime Water Tankers as backups to the Foam Tenders. The Dual Purpose Fire/Water Truck MK1 (DP1) went into service in 1957 and was supplied until 1958. Modifications were made to some and were supplied with a monitor and deployed on Surface-to-Air Missile sites, these vehicles were given the designation of DPMK1A and continued in service until 1980. As the name suggests (Dual Purpose) it was used not just as a water carrier but could be used as a Foam Crash Truck and was also equipped for Domestic Fire Fighting. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

23 AJ 99, KGV 46K RAF Truck Fire Fighting 4 x 2 Domestic Water 100ga..

23 AJ 99, KGV 46K
RAF
Truck Fire Fighting 4 x 2 Domestic Water 100gal Bedford
This appliance was number 22 of a batch of 25 ordered for the Royal Air Force in 1971. This unique series of appliances bore the typically long winded service designation of ‘Truck Fire Fighting 4 x 2 Domestic Water 100gal Bedford’ shortened by Fire Fighters to ‘Mini Angus’. They were bough to provide fire cover at RAF ‘non-flying’ stations such as training establishments, stores depots and hospitals. This particular vehicle spent the majority of it’s service life at RAF Hospital Nocton Hall in Lincolnshire. It went into storage in 1983 and was released from government service early in 1985. In July of the same year it was acquired by Crane Fluid Systems Ltd. and went to Ipswich where it served alongside their Works Fire Brigade until February 1997 when it was acquired for preservation. It has been painted various colours over the course of its life and so is now known as ‘Joseph’. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

PKE 259L, 27 AG 81 Royal Air Force Bedford / Pyrene Mk8

PKE 259L, 27 AG 81
Royal Air Force
Bedford / Pyrene Mk8
The Mk8 was introduced in the early 1970s to replace Mk 5 & Mk 5A Foam vehicles. It was the first modern Crash Tuck to be operated exclusively from the monitor position and had a Jaguar 4.2 ltr engine installed for driving the pump. It was never a popular vehicle amongst RAF Fire-Fighters because the Mk8 was sluggish and ungainly and had the unfortunate tendency of running out of water and petrol far too quickly. The Mk 8 was the last vehicle to use air-blown foam. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

02 AY 22 Defence Fire Services MK11 Scammell Super Major 6×6 Gloster..

02 AY 22
Defence Fire Services
MK11 Scammell Super Major 6×6 Gloster Saro Crash Tender
The MK11 was introduced in the late 80s as a Primary one foam tender to supplement the MK9 fleet. They were mostly based on passenger aircraft airfields and some were fitted with turntable ladders for accessing TriStar flight decks (Mk11A). With an impressive performance and powerful Rosenbauer monitor the Mk11 proved a popular vehicle to work with. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

C763 GVU RAF Fire and Rescue MK10 Carmichael/Scammell Nubian

C763 GVU
RAF Fire and Rescue
MK10 Carmichael/Scammell Nubian
It was in 1981 that Carmichael built the prototype of the MK10 for the RAF Fire Service; it was designed as a Primary 2 Truck which would be used on smaller category airfields. Several variants were made. Most of the MK 10 & 10A versions were converted to a MK10E with the fitting of a new cab and new monitor pipe work. The first Mark 10’s originally had one tank containing a premix foam solution but because of domestic fire fighting requirements the MK10A’s were fitted with separate water and foam tanks. The 10B had a turbo fitted and the 10C was only supplied to the Royal Navy and was fitted with a high pressure pump. The 10D was fitted out to accommodate the Clan Lucas rescue kit. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

02 AY 04 RAF Bedford M1120 4×4

02 AY 04
RAF
Bedford M1120 4×4
Part of The Queens Flight. Several types of vehicles before this were used to support the Helicopter Support Uni (HSU). Three of these vehicles were manufactured. This one, the Bedford M1120 4×4, was built by Edgehills of Hook and was introduced in 1985; It is diesel powered and was designed to carry 200 gallons of AFFF and 120 gallons of Aviation fuel. It carried extinguishers, hand tools, first aid equipment and was complete with it’s own pump. This one was introduced in 1985. They were painted RAF blue with no identification markings. Apart from it’s role as fire rescue/and aircraft refuelling, it also carried radio equipment to act as air traffic control. The RAF Fire-fighters would also act as liaison with all the local area agencies. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

HXA 912 Austin K6 CO2 Tender

HXA 912
Austin K6 CO2 Tender
This truck has four banks of six 60lb CO2 cylinders. Each bank of cylinders has its own operating lever situated on the outside of the cylinder housing and an effective discharge time of 2 minutes. It was built on an Austin K6 3ton chassis and was the first Crash Tender to employ CO2 gas only as an extinguishing medium. It came into service in 1945. The total discharge of the tender is approximately 11,500 cubic feet of CO2 gas. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter

Thorneycroft Nubian TFA 6×6

Thorneycroft Nubian TFA 6×6
The MK7 was introduced in 1965 to supplement the MK6 fleet, and basically consisted of a DP2 chassis fitted with a Rolls Royce B81 Petrol engine and MK6 foam equipment. With it’s improved reliability, a suction eye and water pumping capability, the MK 7 was a more versatile primary one foam tender. It was also easier to transport by air and saw service world wide. This vehicle has a 700 gallon water tank, a foam liquid tank capacity of 110 gallons and a foam output of 5000 gallons per minute through monitor and two side-lines or through double-jet monitor. Seen at the Museum of RAF Firefighting.

Share FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter    Follow FacebooktwitterFacebooktwitter